Southlands, Lymington

The owner of a 1960s bungalow approached Forest Architecture for a contemporary extension and remodelling of the house. The house is quite dark in some areas and has wood-chip surfaces throughout. There is also asbestos located beneath the existing kitchen floor, which will need to be removed by specialists. 

It was important for the owner to have clean lines and surfaces throughout and for there to be an easy connection to the garden; which the current house lacks. The owner also loves baking so a large kitchen with plenty of work space was also key part of the brief.

The house is currently separate from the garage. This cannot be utilised to store a car due to the way the garage was originally designed (it overlaps the back of the house, so a car cannot actually access it). The owner wanted to make use of the garage building and connect it to the house so this is proposed as the utility/dog room. A separate new-build car port is proposed to the front of the property.

The entire back wall of the house is proposed to be demolished to make way for a much larger open-plan kitchen/breakfast space. A separate dining room is also proposed and both spaces are designed with large glazed doors to allow lots of natural light to flood in and to also open up to the garden. Two large rooflights are also proposed over the new kitchen and the new dining room.

The third bedroom is to be converted into an ensuite shower room and the existing separate wc and bathroom are proposed to become one large family bathroom. 

New stone flooring is proposed throughout the house and external terrace, to give the feeling that the garden is a continuation of the house. The extension is proposed to have a white brick finish, with iroko linings around all windows and doors. All of the windows and doors are designed to be double-glazed composite windows for their thermal efficiency and insulation is packed into the entire building envelope to help reduce long-term energy bills.

A wood burner is proposed to sit facing both the kitchen and dining room and another is proposed within the lounge to replace the chimney, which is to be removed.

The project received planning permission in the summer of 2015 and construction will begin in March 2016.

Southlands, Lymington

The owner of a 1960s bungalow approached Forest Architecture for a contemporary extension and remodelling of the house. The house is quite dark in some areas and has wood-chip surfaces throughout. There is also asbestos located beneath the existing kitchen floor, which will need to be removed by specialists. 

It was important for the owner to have clean lines and surfaces throughout and for there to be an easy connection to the garden; which the current house lacks. The owner also loves baking so a large kitchen with plenty of work space was also key part of the brief.

The house is currently separate from the garage. This cannot be utilised to store a car due to the way the garage was originally designed (it overlaps the back of the house, so a car cannot actually access it). The owner wanted to make use of the garage building and connect it to the house so this is proposed as the utility/dog room. A separate new-build car port is proposed to the front of the property.

The entire back wall of the house is proposed to be demolished to make way for a much larger open-plan kitchen/breakfast space. A separate dining room is also proposed and both spaces are designed with large glazed doors to allow lots of natural light to flood in and to also open up to the garden. Two large rooflights are also proposed over the new kitchen and the new dining room.

The third bedroom is to be converted into an ensuite shower room and the existing separate wc and bathroom are proposed to become one large family bathroom. 

New stone flooring is proposed throughout the house and external terrace, to give the feeling that the garden is a continuation of the house. The extension is proposed to have a white brick finish, with iroko linings around all windows and doors. All of the windows and doors are designed to be double-glazed composite windows for their thermal efficiency and insulation is packed into the entire building envelope to help reduce long-term energy bills.

A wood burner is proposed to sit facing both the kitchen and dining room and another is proposed within the lounge to replace the chimney, which is to be removed.

The project received planning permission in the summer of 2015 and construction will begin in March 2016.

the existing house

the existing floor plan

the proposed floor plan

proposed cross section

the proposed front elevation

© nu.ma

© nu.ma