Honey Lane, Burley

Our project on Honey Lane is a 1960-70's bungalow, which we are looking to extend. The properties aligning Honey Lane are varied in their appearance, materials, height and bulk, so there is no set rule to how houses should look; and many houses have been extended into the main garden area, like this proposal seeks to also do. It is a suburban street in the middle of Burley.

The owner of the property approached Forest to look at a proposal which removes the existing garage and makes way for a new kitchen-dining space and front entrance. They also wanted a proposal that avoided blending in with the existing external finishes and instructed Forest to create a proposal that intentionally looked different to the rest of the house.

The existing layout of the house, like many bungalows of its type, does not allow the house and garden to interact. Currently, everything within the main garden is on show, so a wall of hedging has been introduced to act as a device to separate public areas from those that are private. The front door has been relocated to face the driveway and the proposed kitchen/dining space sits on the other side of the hedge to create a much-needed connection with the garden. This was an important aspect of the brief, as the owners are keen gardeners.

Views were generated by opening up the living room front wall and by creating a long view from the new kitchen, through the main hallway and beyond into the rear garden. The proposal creates a lighter, brighter space but also provides somewhere to bring the family together with a view that allows them to appreciate the garden.

Slate cladding was introduced to harmonise its bluish-green tones into this densely overgrown part of the New Forest. The slate was chosen for the external walls as well as the roof and timber cladding was also added where the building is carved out.

A large central rooflight is designed as the highest point in the new kitchen/diner, allowing the space to be flooded with light from above and warmed with afternoon light, through new timber-framed windows and doors. 

The project was submitted for planning approval in August 2015 and after entering into an appeal process, planning consent was granted in March 2016.

"I consider that the extension represents a high quality design appropriate in scale, appearance, siting and materials to the host building given its particular context. The development would not harm the character or appearance of the area. The building as extended would continue to make a neutral contribution to the conservation area, the character and appearance of which would be maintained. There is no conflict with design policies DP1, DP6 or DP11 of the Core Strategy, or with policy CP7 to protect the historic built environment, which includes conservation areas". Planning Inspector

Honey Lane, Burley

Our project on Honey Lane is a 1960-70's bungalow, which we are looking to extend. The properties aligning Honey Lane are varied in their appearance, materials, height and bulk, so there is no set rule to how houses should look; and many houses have been extended into the main garden area, like this proposal seeks to also do. It is a suburban street in the middle of Burley.

The owner of the property approached Forest to look at a proposal which removes the existing garage and makes way for a new kitchen-dining space and front entrance. They also wanted a proposal that avoided blending in with the existing external finishes and instructed Forest to create a proposal that intentionally looked different to the rest of the house.

The existing layout of the house, like many bungalows of its type, does not allow the house and garden to interact. Currently, everything within the main garden is on show, so a wall of hedging has been introduced to act as a device to separate public areas from those that are private. The front door has been relocated to face the driveway and the proposed kitchen/dining space sits on the other side of the hedge to create a much-needed connection with the garden. This was an important aspect of the brief, as the owners are keen gardeners.

Views were generated by opening up the living room front wall and by creating a long view from the new kitchen, through the main hallway and beyond into the rear garden. The proposal creates a lighter, brighter space but also provides somewhere to bring the family together with a view that allows them to appreciate the garden.

Slate cladding was introduced to harmonise its bluish-green tones into this densely overgrown part of the New Forest. The slate was chosen for the external walls as well as the roof and timber cladding was also added where the building is carved out.

A large central rooflight is designed as the highest point in the new kitchen/diner, allowing the space to be flooded with light from above and warmed with afternoon light, through new timber-framed windows and doors. 

The project was submitted for planning approval in August 2015 and after entering into an appeal process, planning consent was granted in March 2016.

"I consider that the extension represents a high quality design appropriate in scale, appearance, siting and materials to the host building given its particular context. The development would not harm the character or appearance of the area. The building as extended would continue to make a neutral contribution to the conservation area, the character and appearance of which would be maintained. There is no conflict with design policies DP1, DP6 or DP11 of the Core Strategy, or with policy CP7 to protect the historic built environment, which includes conservation areas". Planning Inspector

material palette

proposed floor plan

proposed roof plan

long section

© nu.ma

© nu.ma