Meadow Cottage, Dartmoor National Park

Our Client approached Forest Architecture to design a two-storey extension to their period property, which would provide an accessible bathroom on the ground floor, a more gentle staircase between the two floors and an ensuite bathroom for the master bedroom. This was to satisfy their need to future-proof their home for later years. The proposal also had to consider an existing covenant, which allows the next door neighbour access passed the side of Meadow Cottage, through to the main road.

Most of the houses within the hamlet are built from local granite stone with a traditional lime render. Taking precedent from the black and white palette of the nearby houses, Forest Architecture designed a simple, timber framed extension clad with locally sourced Douglas Fir, which would be stained in a dark tone to merge into the immediate context. The extension enjoys a double-height entrance space, which is ventilated naturally through two opening roof-lights.

Project Status: The proposal gained support from Dartmoor National Park Authority because it was designed in contrast to the existing building; and subsequently gained planning permission in October 2014. Construction began in September 2015.

Meadow Cottage, Dartmoor National Park

Our Client approached Forest Architecture to design a two-storey extension to their period property, which would provide an accessible bathroom on the ground floor, a more gentle staircase between the two floors and an ensuite bathroom for the master bedroom. This was to satisfy their need to future-proof their home for later years. The proposal also had to consider an existing covenant, which allows the next door neighbour access passed the side of Meadow Cottage, through to the main road.

Most of the houses within the hamlet are built from local granite stone with a traditional lime render. Taking precedent from the black and white palette of the nearby houses, Forest Architecture designed a simple, timber framed extension clad with locally sourced Douglas Fir, which would be stained in a dark tone to merge into the immediate context. The extension enjoys a double-height entrance space, which is ventilated naturally through two opening roof-lights.

Project Status: The proposal gained support from Dartmoor National Park Authority because it was designed in contrast to the existing building; and subsequently gained planning permission in October 2014. Construction began in September 2015.

The existing house

first floor plan

ground floor plan

north elevation

the existing cottage

the cottage with the proposed extension

© nu.ma

New-build two-storey extension

© James Richardson

© James Richardson

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers