The Zinc House, Lymington, Hampshire

The original extension on this property was constructed using a single-skin of brickwork. It was damp and incredibly poorly built. Furthermore, the ridge level of the roof obscured the views from the master bedroom. The brief provided by the owners of this property was to create a new open-plan, kitchen-dining space, which was light, bright and voluminous, however the owners struggled to envisage how a tall space could connect to the existing property and still not block their upper floor view.

Two design options were developed as part of an initial feasibility and the owners instantly chose the zinc-clad design to developed further. As a property with a zinc roof sat alongside the site, the material was already within the context, so precedent existed to make use of this material within the project.  

The open-plan, kitchen-dining space was designed to be vaulted internally and a narrow area of flat roof was considered to allow the vaulted space to connect with existing property; without being visible. In order to soften the overall appearance of the zinc, sweet chestnut cladding was introduced; picking up on the warm colours within the garden.

Internally, the entire kitchen-dining space is white. Three rooflights, sitting at three different angles  flood daylight into the space and also help to ventilate it during periods of warmer weather. A large picture window captures the view to the garden and a single-sliding door into a timber-clad wall provides access to the garden. The same floor tiles used internally are used externally as well to create a seamless transition between inside and outside.

The existing house was also revamped elsewhere within the ground floor and all of the windows on the external elevation were replaced to match the glazing within the extension.

Project Status: Completed 2018

Main Contractor: Tim Marolia Building Limited 

Structural Engineer: R. Elliott and Associates

The Zinc House, Lymington, Hampshire

The original extension on this property was constructed using a single-skin of brickwork. It was damp and incredibly poorly built. Furthermore, the ridge level of the roof obscured the views from the master bedroom. The brief provided by the owners of this property was to create a new open-plan, kitchen-dining space, which was light, bright and voluminous, however the owners struggled to envisage how a tall space could connect to the existing property and still not block their upper floor view.

Two design options were developed as part of an initial feasibility and the owners instantly chose the zinc-clad design to developed further. As a property with a zinc roof sat alongside the site, the material was already within the context, so precedent existed to make use of this material within the project.  

The open-plan, kitchen-dining space was designed to be vaulted internally and a narrow area of flat roof was considered to allow the vaulted space to connect with existing property; without being visible. In order to soften the overall appearance of the zinc, sweet chestnut cladding was introduced; picking up on the warm colours within the garden.

Internally, the entire kitchen-dining space is white. Three rooflights, sitting at three different angles  flood daylight into the space and also help to ventilate it during periods of warmer weather. A large picture window captures the view to the garden and a single-sliding door into a timber-clad wall provides access to the garden. The same floor tiles used internally are used externally as well to create a seamless transition between inside and outside.

The existing house was also revamped elsewhere within the ground floor and all of the windows on the external elevation were replaced to match the glazing within the extension.

Project Status: Completed 2018

Main Contractor: Tim Marolia Building Limited 

Structural Engineer: R. Elliott and Associates

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers

© Richard Chivers